Acton Institute Powerblog Archives

Post Tagged 'Great Britain'

Threats to Religious Liberty in the U.K.

There is a real possibility that the next general election in the United Kingdom will take place within a few weeks of the presidential election in the United States. It is fair to say that no one knows what will happen on either side of the Atlantic. Continue Reading...

The Countess of Huntingdon: Challenging the Established Church

Among the central figures of the British evangelical revival that we have been revisiting is Selina, Countess of Huntingdon, (1707–1791). She was a source of finance and a steadying influence, and through her aristocratic connections Selina provided opportunities for the preaching of the gospel in the upper echelons of society. Continue Reading...

Lord Shaftesbury: Evangelical Social Reformer

“I want nothing but usefulness to God and my country” (Diaries, February 22, 1827) When the funeral procession of Lord Shaftesbury progressed through the streets of London toward Westminster Abbey on October 8, 1885, thousands of people lined the streets, bands gathered to play Christian hymns, and hundreds of banners were held high with Bible verses. Continue Reading...

Audio: Samuel Gregg on Theresa May’s Election Blunder

On Friday afternoon, Acton Institute Director of Programs Samuel Gregg joins guest host Paul Kengor on Ave Maria Radio’s Kresta in the Afternoon to discuss the shocking results of last week’s snap UK elections that saw Theresa May and the Tories lose their majority in the UK Parliament. Continue Reading...

Samuel Gregg: Europe Is Rotting

Sam Gregg, Acton’s Director of Research, bemoans the state of Europe in The American Spectator today. In a piece entitled, “Something is Rotten in the State of Europe,” Gregg begins by noting that Germany seems to have lost all common sense. Continue Reading...

The Audacity of Austerity

The title of this post borrows from a phrase I employ in the conclusion of tomorrow’s Acton Commentary on the prospects for austerity in America after today’s mid-term elections. (I can’t claim to have coined the term, since about 4,270 other instances of the phrase show up in a Google search, but I like it nonetheless.) Continue Reading...