Trey Dimsdale

Trey Dimsdale serves as counsel for First Liberty Institute (FLI) and executive director of the Center for Religion, Culture & Democracy, an FLI initiative focused on education and cultural advocacy for freedom.

Posts by Trey Dimsdale

When a Judge Is Forced Off the Bench

“Bury the lead!” is certainly unusual editorial advice but possibly the only good strategy for an essay on the vagaries of the federal court system. You never want your readers to know that they might find the subject matter of your essay less than exciting. Continue Reading...

A Win for Religious Employees

As it turns out, the Supreme Court last week opted against transforming the United States into a totalitarian, theocratic hellscape like the New York Times’ Linda Greenhouse had prophesied in January. Continue Reading...

Affirmative Action and the Imago Dei

In the days since the Supreme Court handed down its landmark ruling in Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard, the media have been saturated with sympathetic personal stories of accomplished people who claim they (or others claim) would never have had a chance at success without race-based affirmative action policies in college admissions. Continue Reading...

Why the Anglican Communion Matters

As an ecclesial model, Anglicanism has until recently managed controversy and diversity better than almost any other. The generous boundaries of the tradition have space for a wide spectrum of expressions, from low-church evangelical to the Anglo-Catholicism of the Oxford Movement to charismatic, nonliturgical modern worship in individual parishes like London’s Holy Trinity Brompton to local expressions influenced by the best parts of regional culture throughout Africa and Asia. Continue Reading...

Why Christianity Is Necessary for Liberty

Depending on one’s perspective, religious freedom was either born or died with the founding of the United States of America. The colonial powers of Europe of the late 18th century had dominant religious majorities and established churches. Continue Reading...

Antonin Scalia’s Rise to Greatness

When Judge Antonin Scalia was confirmed to a seat on the Supreme Court of the United States on September 16, 1986, no senator voted in opposition. He was confirmed by a vote of 98-to-0, a margin completely unthinkable 30 years later. Continue Reading...

What can we expect from Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson?

There is almost no institution in the past 100 years that has more profoundly shaped American public life than the Supreme Court. As a result, the composition of the Supreme Court has become one of the most prominent issues in every campaign season—whether it is the presidential election cycle or the midterm congressional elections. Continue Reading...