Latest Posts

We Need More Cosmopolitan Christians

If there’s one particular type of person that the world’s most important cities—New York, Washington, D.C., London—need more than any other it’s … the saint. Of course, we need saints everywhere, but the cruciality of our cities as centers of culture means we have a special need for virtuous Christians to be in cities—first to sanctify them but also to take advantage of the abundance of resources and learn from the innovations found there. Continue Reading...

Cognitive Dissonance at the New York Times

Any rational person will readily agree that life in America has become slightly insane. This was true especially of COVID time and its consequences, be they medical, political, or existential. But even before that, much of America had endured the tyranny of “political correctness”—a term that has gone out of fashion, replaced by “woke” or “wokeism.” Continue Reading...

A High and Holy Art for All

These days, the world of contemporary American poetry is less one world than many. Never has so much poetry been published; rarely have there been more “camps” or “contingents” that have little to say to each other. Continue Reading...

A CNN Host Does History

Fareed Zakaria acknowledges in Age of Revolutions: Progress and Backlash from 1600 to the Present, that “scholars who detail the way that material conditions and individual freedoms have improved over the centuries are often dismissed as peddlers of ‘Whig history.’” Continue Reading...

What to the Abolitionist Was the Fourth of July?

In academia and culture alike, it has become fashionable to dismiss the principles associated with American independence as shortsighted at best and intentionally exclusionary at worst. “Neither Jefferson nor most of the founders intended to abolish slavery,” wrote Nikole Hannah-Jones in the New York Times Magazine debut of the 1619 Project in August 2019. Continue Reading...